Mirror Effect Using Photoshop

The first thing you will need to do is upload the images to your computer. After that, you will need to open Photoshop and then access the images in it one by one. Once you have opened the first image, right-click on it and then click on the option that says ‘Duplicate Layer’ and then click on ‘OK’. At this point, you will have to drag the panel where the image is displayed and increase its size in order to create space for the mirror image under it. After that create a ‘New Guide’ by selecting the same from the menu option called ‘View’.

The value for ‘Orientation’ and ‘Position’ should be ‘Vertical’ and ‘50%’ respectively. Now, you should drag the main image to the left of the guide that has been created with the help of the ‘Move tool’. Now select the portion of the image that should be ‘mirrored’ and then place it into a new layer. Now, making sure that in the layers panel, the ‘Background copy’ option is selected, flip the duplicate layer by clicking on Transform> Flip Horizontal and then move the reversed image immediately below the original (must fit together perfectly).

To move the image, hold down the ‘Ctrl key’ on the keyboard while simultaneously pressing the left button of the mouse. Click on ‘Enter’ and then exit the Transform command for the changes to be effective. Apart from that, you will also need to click on the ‘View’ menu and then click on ‘Click Guides’ for removing the guide and getting the final image with mirror effect. The next step will be to save the image created on your computer. You can then access it and upload it to your website or social networking sites for creating innovative and appealing advertising campaigns.

Night Vision Security Cameras

There are many types of cameras available in the market. To decide which camera will suit your needs and which one you should buy, some home work is required. The different types of night vision cameras are:

  • Outdoor wired night vision surveillance camera: these are ideal for outdoor applications. Using this camera, you can monitor whatever is happening in the area covered by the camera.
  • Motion Sensor Cameras: They use sensors to detect motion. Recording is only started, when the sensor sees some motion. The advantage of this kind of camera is that it reduces the recording time.
  • Vandal proof night cameras: These cameras are used in vandalism prone areas. These cameras are very sturdy and difficult to be ruined by a vandal.
  • Day night color cameras: color recording is done during day time. And in night, the camera automatically switches to black and white mode.
  • Infrared night cameras: Night vision cameras work well even in low-light conditions. But for places with no light, infrared night vision camera is required.
  • Mobile spy night cameras: As the name suggests, mobile spy cameras are mobile and can be placed anywhere near the area you want to do recording. Night vision is used when you use these cameras in night as they can see things even in dark.
  • Wireless night vision camera: are very easy to use. These cameras can be moved anywhere without re-installation.

Night vision cameras with infrared feature can be used in any kind of lighting conditions, low light condition, or no light condition. The advantage of a night vision camera is that it can see things, which is otherwise not visible to a naked human eye. However, night vision cameras with infrared illumination are quite expensive comparative to its other counter parts.

Choosing a security camera that fulfills all your requirements is not an easy task. There are so many security cameras available in the market that it may confuse you in deciding, which camera you should buy. The basic factors that you should consider before buying are: type of application (indoor or outdoor), camera resolution (low or high), camera model (static or PTZ model), and the type of camera (day/night or only night vision).

Mind-Blowing Photography Tips For Beginners

Work the subject!

Try shooting the same thing in as many ways you can that capture different aspects about it. After you shoot look through your shoot and critique your work. Be mindful of what worked and what didn’t and why. Editing your shoot is an important part of the learning process.

Study the work of other photographers.

Find something that inspires you and pay attention to what you like and try to mimic it. Then try to make it your own by bringing in something new and different.

Familiarize yourself with photography software!

Digital software is today’s darkroom & developing an image is just as important as how you shoot it. My favorite way to digitally polish my images is through Lightroom. It’s amazing what it allows you to do to an image without exposing yourself to chemicals or wasting photo paper and developer. The preset filters are a great way to intensify the tone of the image, but you must know how to fine-tune them to make the image just so. Photoshop is also an important tool.

Learn Lighting!

I suggest photographing a subject at different times of day and compare them. If you have access to professional lighting equipment try shooting your subject lit from different angles, diffusion vs. Hard lighting, etc… There are jobs just dedicated to lighting on high-end shoots, so there are no limits there if you have the budget. Really think about how the light conveys your message to the viewer.

Go with your instincts!

Make sure what you are shooting is fulfilling something for you. There is no point in shooting something you aren’t enjoying. It will show in your work! The more you are passionate about it, the more creatively you can capture it! I’ve worked with so many photographers that have talent, but take on shoots they don’t enjoy and it showed in the quality of the images. For example, I could never understand why somebody would hire a nature photographer to shoot their portraits. Somebody that isn’t a people person doesn’t take flattering photos of people no matter how much technical knowledge they have. On the other hand, if you see all people as beautiful and you have a natural talent for making a person feel good about him/herself, then portrait photography is a great niche!

How to Create Frightening Photos

Choose a subject

Ask a close friend or family member to be your model for this scary shot, and set up a camera on a tripod. Firstly, take a photo of a room which can be used as the background in the completed image. Making sure that you don’t move the camera and without adjusting the settings, ask your model to position themselves in front of the camera in the same room where you took your background image. You will need to take a photo of your model on a prop that provides a raised surface from the ground to give the impression that they are levitating. A ladder, table or chair will provide you with the effect you need, but ensure safety precautions are taken at all times, and help your model on and off the platform. Make sure that you don’t move the camera when you are taking the photograph.

Make use of photo editing software

Using a photo editing program of your choice, load your digital prints and place both the background photograph and the image of your model side-by-side in the software. Using your mouse, place the image with your model on top of the original background image. Both photographs should be lined up correctly. Set the image opacity for the photograph with your model to around 50% by using the opacity tool in the control panel of the software program. Experiment with the different settings.

Use filters and layers

To create a ghostly image of a person levitating, use a layer mask from the control panel of your software program and use an eraser or brush tool to cover-up the prop that you used in your second photo. Because you used the opacity tool in the previous step, the area which contained your prop should be filled with the underlying background image to create a scary levitation effect. Save your image and send your levitation photography to family and friends.

Effects of Photography

Bokeh

The aesthetic quality of blur out of primary image focus is known as bokeh. Light offers more light to areas not in focus but is near the object. Lens aberrations and aperture shape differences, cause the blur resulting to beautiful looks. There is both good and bad bokeh, in the bad bokeh, blur mostly distracts observers from the focus areas and is harsh hence ruins a photographers work. Good bokeh enhances the image look.

Panning

Panning is a photography technique that is mostly used to shoot moving objects such as sports cars, race competitions. It involves the horizontal, rotational and vertical movement of an image or video. To achieve best results of a sharp subject with a blurred background, you need to stay with an object as you frame and press the shutter button. It is among the old techniques, so it needs a lot of practice and patience to master.

Thirds rule

It is a method that is frequently used by artists and painters. Work produced using the technique can be found in art galleries. The rule of thirds method involves breaking down the photo in thirds, vertically and horizontally to have nine parts. The focus object is usually not placed in the middle which results to it being interesting, moving and dynamic. Factors to consider are the point of interest and the frame. Mentally divide your viewfinder into three to frame the shot.

Golden hour

Also referred to as the magic hour, it is the first hour of sunrise and last time of the sunset. The light is of different quality thus add quality and interest to the photo. It requires one to be fast for the quality of light fades quickly

Flash Photography

When you’ve adjusted your ISO and don’t want to risk introducing any “noise” into your images; and when you’ve adjusted your Aperture to get the right amount of depth of field (e.g. everything in sharp focus or background blurred to make your foreground subject stand out more clearly; and when you’ve adjusted your Shutter Speed as fast or slow as you want it… and you’re STILL not getting enough light onto your sensor, to expose your photo(s) properly? Well, that’s when you need to add some flash into the mix, preferably from an external flash (as you can control direction, as well as the power of the light, to get that perfect balance of light hitting your subject when you take the shot). The “pop-up” flash on your camera is better when you’re able to turn down the power, so you’re just “kissing” subtle light onto your subject, to fill in what would otherwise be lost to shadows, but because it’s facing your subject directly, it tends not to give the most flattering look, especially when taking photos of people. If you can get hold of an external flash unit, you will improve the look by taking the flash off to the side (at an approximate 45-degree angle from your subject).

Depending on the external flash unit you get, you will be able to change certain settings on the flash, to add sufficient light when you don’t want to make any further changes to your camera settings.

Settings that top of the range flash units allow you to adjust, include:

  • Flash Power… this will be a feature of virtually all external flash units, allowing you to keep the ISO on your camera low, by increasing the power of the flash output.
  • Flash Zoom… if this is an option on your flash, you’ll be able to select a wide angle setting, to spread the light wider in the foreground; or you can zoom the flash to get it to spread deeper into the scene (but at the expense of how wide the light will spread – the further out you zoom the flash, the narrower the beam).

Trick Photography Method

The content will guide both professionals and beginners. What beginners need to know is about their camera. If you already have a DSLR then you already have what is required for trick photography. Get familiar with its settings and start clicking. Secondly, when it comes to capturing light drawings you need long exposures. For that you need to purchase LED lights or strips which you can get from Amazon.

Before I start guiding you about pro level trick photography tricks, I want to make one thing clear. Most of the beginners believe that to get a beautiful photograph, you need to have good editing skills. Well, you have been misguided, pictures do require editing but it is not the major thing. Focus on techniques and learn editing skills later when need arises.

So, are you fully prepared to learn a few amazing pro level photography tricks? Let’s begin!

  1. When using Maglite or any other bright light source, remove its cover in order to get a clear image.
  2. Want to trace the outline of an object and want to give a neon effect? Easy. Perform this trick in pitch dark by drawing across the object as quickly as you can.
  3. Tie a light source with a string if you want the light to go through small objects.
  4. By placing the camera on the floor with the pitch dark background while using long exposures, you can create a pure light drawing. Use LED or camera flash as a source of light.
  5. Try giving your trick photograph smoky effect by placing the object in front of a blank background, using overhead light and adjusting the settings of ISO to the lowest point. Draw the smoke from reference point while positioning the light at a single point.

Commercial Photography Details

While some commercial photographers concentrate on one field, others may offer a generalized service. Generally, these professionals engage by agencies like advertising firms and event organizers. On the other hand, freelance commercial photographers cover a diverse range of fields. Some of the most common subjects covered by them are – tourism, photojournalism shoots, weddings, school photos, pets, family pictures, football matches and even graduations. Shots taken by commercial photographers must look a lot more polished and stylized than pictures taken by amateur photographers. If you’re considering stepping into the world of commercial photography, there’s a range of things that you must do for enhancing your accuracy and skills. With commercial photography courses, you can easily master these skills and emerge successful. Even if it costs you a little, it’ll surely reap you benefits in the long run.

When it comes to photography, you need to have the right kind of lighting. Poor lighting arrangements can create awful reflections and shadows that change your photo session into a nightmare. On the other hand, perfect lighting arrangements can make your subject look awesome. Commercial photographers make use of special lighting to get the best shot possible – bringing the subject in focus and giving it a neat look. While taking long-range shots, it’s better to use strobe lighting. This gives any flat commodity a spectacular three-dimensional effect; they also use light boxes beneath the commodity for closer work.

For most light effect, you may even change the shutter in your camera. For deeper light and shadow effects, take snaps in black and white.

Skilled commercial photographers use more than a mere white background for giving the commodity an attractive look. At times, the minimalist mode of shooting is not everything. As a thorough professional, you must create the right kind of setting for the product. For a better mood, consider using colored or dramatic light effects. It makes no sense to shoot a bike in a living room; so, put everything in the right place. Whether your shooting flowers or ornaments, make sure that it’s shot in the right setting. Else, all your efforts may go in vain.

Choose a Point and Shoot Camera

  • Usage. The first question that needs answering is what do you intend to use it for? Most of us just want to take happy snaps and are not too bothered about camera functions, as long as you get an in focus photo most, if not all of the time? Like me, do you want some flexibility with zoom control, resolution and maybe HD video production?
  • Price. In all fairness, the price tag is one of the more important factors when choosing a camera and there’s a large range of prices out there. Decide what suits your pocket and go from there. You might want o consider getting last year’s model as it will be significantly cheaper that the up to date model.
  • Size/style/ergonomics. Have a look at some cameras in the stores and handle as many as possible. I say handle because most of the time it’s how a camera feels to the user that’s an important factor. Does it fit comfortably in the hand? It should be the right size for your hand. It should look and feel well made, rugged even, so that a knock or minor accident doesn’t wreck it. Is it shock proof or even water proof? How does it look? I like black for a camera colour, being conservative, and it does go with my Nikon cameras. Some of you will like the more distinctive colours, the reds, blues or even pinks! Have a look at the grouping of the controls. Can you handle the camera with one hand and still use most of the controls? If you are right handed, then the controls should on the right hand side of the top and back of the camera. Your left hand should only be used to steady the camera. In fact, I find that if I grip the camera with both hands and twist slightly in opposite directions, this provides a good stable feel without camera shake.
  • Flash. Does it have flash capability? Can it be switched off when not needed? A built in flash on most point and shoot cameras doesn’t have much range but it can be used to effectively fill in shadows. It’s much better to have a camera that works well in low light levels without flash. Take a photo in the store if you can and check out the result. Some stores are switched on enough to have demo models available for customer use.
  • Megapixels. Every body seems to think that the more megapixels the camera has, then the better the photo that can be taken. Generally that’s true if the sensor is large enough and the lens is good quality one… Most compact cameras have a sensor size of 1/2.3″ which really isn’t enough in low light conditions, The higher end cameras, costing quite a bit more, have sensors that are 1/1.7″. They invariably don’t have the zoom capability some of the smaller sensor cameras have, but they do perform better in low light conditions and you can achieve some depth of field with them.
  • Lens. Talking about lens, this is the most important aspect of a camera that I look for. Without a good lens, the camera really won’t perform very well. A standard compact camera can offer 35mm to perhaps 150mm focal length range. That’s fine for portrait shots but if you want to take landscapes then find a camera offering a wide angle capability of 24mm and an upper range of 200mm so you capture long range wildlife or sports action shots. There are cameras out there that offer a super zoom of 400mm. Another aspect of lens quality is the aperture range. Lower f values like f1.8, i.e. larger apertures, work better in low light conditions. A rule of thumb to gauge lens quality is to check how much glass you can see. The larger glass area suggests a better quality lens.
  • LCD screen. You should look for a camera with at least a 2.5-inch display, although 3 inches is preferable. The reason is that you will be using the screen to frame your shots and then review them afterwards. Larger is better in this case. However, linked to the size of the screen is its resolution display component. Some 3 inch screens offer a 230k dot display which is just about OK for that size screen. If you want really sharp images, then go for a camera offering 460k or 921k dot displays. Finally, some cameras offer rotating and tilting screens which can be handy in sunlight glare or when you want to take a photo at an unusual angle or close to the ground.

Knowing Lighting Ratios

A general scare exists among photographers at any photo studio about lighting, but in fact there is no mystery about it. There exist two aspects of it: exposure and shadows. Of course, there are more things to it that need to be taken into consideration like color, composition, background, makeup and hair if it is shooting a model.

In the studio, special attention needs to be paid to the exposure relationships between the different light sources, which is expressed as ratios and determine the places where it needs to be placed to make the subject look good. Here comes the role of shadows.

Lighting Ratios: If light is placed in front of a model directly, there is no need to consider about ratio. The exposure is straightforward. To set up the image, a meter could be used in incident mode and the metered reading taken.

With two lights, the input can be varied (hence the exposure) with each of it by changing the distance between the subject and the source and also making changes to the power setting. With light ratio of 2:1, the difference between the main light and the fill light is one f-stop.

For a 3:1 lighting ratio, there are one and a half f-stops of discrepancy between the two sources. Digital cameras use 1/3 f-stop increments to measure light, though the 3:1 ratio as was used traditionally is taken with half f-stops.

Due to the ability of sophisticated handheld light meters to read light in tenths of an f-stop, one can easily determine one and a half f-stops if there is a requirement of such ratio.

The positioning of a handheld meter helps in precisely measuring the light on a product of face and is a great advantage to the photographer. By measuring a reading from the position of the subject after pointing the meter’s white dome toward the primary light source, the correct exposure can be determined for the main source.

Then on removing the white dome away from the main light projecting toward the fill, a precise reading on a fill light could be taken. By taking note of the f-stop readouts as given on the LCD and making adjustment to the light, the ratio could be found that will help in making the subject look in the way that is needed. It is not always necessary that studio lighting is taken in the studio itself. The outdoor location could be turned into a studio.