Trick Photography Method

The content will guide both professionals and beginners. What beginners need to know is about their camera. If you already have a DSLR then you already have what is required for trick photography. Get familiar with its settings and start clicking. Secondly, when it comes to capturing light drawings you need long exposures. For that you need to purchase LED lights or strips which you can get from Amazon.

Before I start guiding you about pro level trick photography tricks, I want to make one thing clear. Most of the beginners believe that to get a beautiful photograph, you need to have good editing skills. Well, you have been misguided, pictures do require editing but it is not the major thing. Focus on techniques and learn editing skills later when need arises.

So, are you fully prepared to learn a few amazing pro level photography tricks? Let’s begin!

  1. When using Maglite or any other bright light source, remove its cover in order to get a clear image.
  2. Want to trace the outline of an object and want to give a neon effect? Easy. Perform this trick in pitch dark by drawing across the object as quickly as you can.
  3. Tie a light source with a string if you want the light to go through small objects.
  4. By placing the camera on the floor with the pitch dark background while using long exposures, you can create a pure light drawing. Use LED or camera flash as a source of light.
  5. Try giving your trick photograph smoky effect by placing the object in front of a blank background, using overhead light and adjusting the settings of ISO to the lowest point. Draw the smoke from reference point while positioning the light at a single point.

Commercial Photography Details

While some commercial photographers concentrate on one field, others may offer a generalized service. Generally, these professionals engage by agencies like advertising firms and event organizers. On the other hand, freelance commercial photographers cover a diverse range of fields. Some of the most common subjects covered by them are – tourism, photojournalism shoots, weddings, school photos, pets, family pictures, football matches and even graduations. Shots taken by commercial photographers must look a lot more polished and stylized than pictures taken by amateur photographers. If you’re considering stepping into the world of commercial photography, there’s a range of things that you must do for enhancing your accuracy and skills. With commercial photography courses, you can easily master these skills and emerge successful. Even if it costs you a little, it’ll surely reap you benefits in the long run.

When it comes to photography, you need to have the right kind of lighting. Poor lighting arrangements can create awful reflections and shadows that change your photo session into a nightmare. On the other hand, perfect lighting arrangements can make your subject look awesome. Commercial photographers make use of special lighting to get the best shot possible – bringing the subject in focus and giving it a neat look. While taking long-range shots, it’s better to use strobe lighting. This gives any flat commodity a spectacular three-dimensional effect; they also use light boxes beneath the commodity for closer work.

For most light effect, you may even change the shutter in your camera. For deeper light and shadow effects, take snaps in black and white.

Skilled commercial photographers use more than a mere white background for giving the commodity an attractive look. At times, the minimalist mode of shooting is not everything. As a thorough professional, you must create the right kind of setting for the product. For a better mood, consider using colored or dramatic light effects. It makes no sense to shoot a bike in a living room; so, put everything in the right place. Whether your shooting flowers or ornaments, make sure that it’s shot in the right setting. Else, all your efforts may go in vain.

Choose a Point and Shoot Camera

  • Usage. The first question that needs answering is what do you intend to use it for? Most of us just want to take happy snaps and are not too bothered about camera functions, as long as you get an in focus photo most, if not all of the time? Like me, do you want some flexibility with zoom control, resolution and maybe HD video production?
  • Price. In all fairness, the price tag is one of the more important factors when choosing a camera and there’s a large range of prices out there. Decide what suits your pocket and go from there. You might want o consider getting last year’s model as it will be significantly cheaper that the up to date model.
  • Size/style/ergonomics. Have a look at some cameras in the stores and handle as many as possible. I say handle because most of the time it’s how a camera feels to the user that’s an important factor. Does it fit comfortably in the hand? It should be the right size for your hand. It should look and feel well made, rugged even, so that a knock or minor accident doesn’t wreck it. Is it shock proof or even water proof? How does it look? I like black for a camera colour, being conservative, and it does go with my Nikon cameras. Some of you will like the more distinctive colours, the reds, blues or even pinks! Have a look at the grouping of the controls. Can you handle the camera with one hand and still use most of the controls? If you are right handed, then the controls should on the right hand side of the top and back of the camera. Your left hand should only be used to steady the camera. In fact, I find that if I grip the camera with both hands and twist slightly in opposite directions, this provides a good stable feel without camera shake.
  • Flash. Does it have flash capability? Can it be switched off when not needed? A built in flash on most point and shoot cameras doesn’t have much range but it can be used to effectively fill in shadows. It’s much better to have a camera that works well in low light levels without flash. Take a photo in the store if you can and check out the result. Some stores are switched on enough to have demo models available for customer use.
  • Megapixels. Every body seems to think that the more megapixels the camera has, then the better the photo that can be taken. Generally that’s true if the sensor is large enough and the lens is good quality one… Most compact cameras have a sensor size of 1/2.3″ which really isn’t enough in low light conditions, The higher end cameras, costing quite a bit more, have sensors that are 1/1.7″. They invariably don’t have the zoom capability some of the smaller sensor cameras have, but they do perform better in low light conditions and you can achieve some depth of field with them.
  • Lens. Talking about lens, this is the most important aspect of a camera that I look for. Without a good lens, the camera really won’t perform very well. A standard compact camera can offer 35mm to perhaps 150mm focal length range. That’s fine for portrait shots but if you want to take landscapes then find a camera offering a wide angle capability of 24mm and an upper range of 200mm so you capture long range wildlife or sports action shots. There are cameras out there that offer a super zoom of 400mm. Another aspect of lens quality is the aperture range. Lower f values like f1.8, i.e. larger apertures, work better in low light conditions. A rule of thumb to gauge lens quality is to check how much glass you can see. The larger glass area suggests a better quality lens.
  • LCD screen. You should look for a camera with at least a 2.5-inch display, although 3 inches is preferable. The reason is that you will be using the screen to frame your shots and then review them afterwards. Larger is better in this case. However, linked to the size of the screen is its resolution display component. Some 3 inch screens offer a 230k dot display which is just about OK for that size screen. If you want really sharp images, then go for a camera offering 460k or 921k dot displays. Finally, some cameras offer rotating and tilting screens which can be handy in sunlight glare or when you want to take a photo at an unusual angle or close to the ground.

Knowing Lighting Ratios

A general scare exists among photographers at any photo studio about lighting, but in fact there is no mystery about it. There exist two aspects of it: exposure and shadows. Of course, there are more things to it that need to be taken into consideration like color, composition, background, makeup and hair if it is shooting a model.

In the studio, special attention needs to be paid to the exposure relationships between the different light sources, which is expressed as ratios and determine the places where it needs to be placed to make the subject look good. Here comes the role of shadows.

Lighting Ratios: If light is placed in front of a model directly, there is no need to consider about ratio. The exposure is straightforward. To set up the image, a meter could be used in incident mode and the metered reading taken.

With two lights, the input can be varied (hence the exposure) with each of it by changing the distance between the subject and the source and also making changes to the power setting. With light ratio of 2:1, the difference between the main light and the fill light is one f-stop.

For a 3:1 lighting ratio, there are one and a half f-stops of discrepancy between the two sources. Digital cameras use 1/3 f-stop increments to measure light, though the 3:1 ratio as was used traditionally is taken with half f-stops.

Due to the ability of sophisticated handheld light meters to read light in tenths of an f-stop, one can easily determine one and a half f-stops if there is a requirement of such ratio.

The positioning of a handheld meter helps in precisely measuring the light on a product of face and is a great advantage to the photographer. By measuring a reading from the position of the subject after pointing the meter’s white dome toward the primary light source, the correct exposure can be determined for the main source.

Then on removing the white dome away from the main light projecting toward the fill, a precise reading on a fill light could be taken. By taking note of the f-stop readouts as given on the LCD and making adjustment to the light, the ratio could be found that will help in making the subject look in the way that is needed. It is not always necessary that studio lighting is taken in the studio itself. The outdoor location could be turned into a studio.

Pooch Pics

Try a trigger word such as, “walk”, “drive” or a word they know that will peak their interest to get a lively look from them. Some dogs are too excitable for this though and you may have to leave a long lead on them and work with them a bit. The key to dogs learning is repetition so it may take a few times before you get them to stay just where you want them to. As for backgrounds it would be best to pick a background that suits the look of your pet. Puppies look best from a very low angle, up close, in long grass. Dropping to a lower angle can also make your older dog look a little more puppy like, especially when you get in close. The colour of your dog or cat, is important when it comes to the background, and the whole essence of a good photograph. A lightly coloured or even white coloured coat can often wash out against a white wall, so be mindful of the “blending issue”, where you pet can disappear into the background.

Soon you will discover that photographing pets – or dogs in particular – is not harder than photographing children or shooting family portraits. This is an ever-going field of photography that attracts many new and seasoned photographers alike.

Compact Cameras

Just what is a super zoom compact camera? This class of digital camera comes in a few different configurations but what they all have in common is zoom lenses of at least 10X. Some will look just like other pocket friendly digital cameras but they will be a little thicker to contain the long lens. Others will resemble a pro camera complete with a hand grip and a lens that doesn’t retract flush to the body. We call these latter cameras “bridge” cameras because they aren’t really compact cameras nor are they big DSLR style cameras, they bridge between those two popular groups.

The super zoom cameras are often called “sports zooms” because they are favored by soccer, football and baseball parents ten to one. Parents of children playing organized outdoor sports are the number users of super zoom cameras. They can’t get any closer to the players than the sidelines but a super zoom can put them in the middle of the huddle.

There are a number of super zoom cameras available but for our purposes we will look at six models as representatives of the group. Canon, Fuji, Olympus and Nikon set the standard in this class and each has a model in our discussion.

The easiest way to divide up the super zoom class is by price. With our chosen samples the price break is at $300.00, there are three models above this price and three below it. We will start with the lower priced group first.

Our under $300 super zooms are the Nikon L110, the Canon SX130 IS and the Fuji S1800. All three cameras offer 12 megapixel resolution, image stabilization and all three capture 720p HD video – but the Nikon L110 is the only model with an HDMI port for direct HDTV connection. One other interesting trait is that all three are powered by AA batteries, something increasingly rare in digital cameras.

Starting with the Fuji S1800 we find a surprisingly well equipped camera for about $229.99. In design it is a bridge camera with a pronounced grip and lens housing. The camera features an 18X zoom lens and fast 8 frames per second image capture. The 3 inch LCD viewscreen is clear and bright, the controls are easy to understand and use. We recommend this camera for both its price and its high image quality.

The middle child of this price range is the Canon SX130 IS. The SX130 looks like a standard compact camera but chunkier. Tucked inside is a powerful 12X zoom lens and Canon’s new SMARTAuto mode that takes most of the guesswork out of taking pictures. Priced at $249.99 the SX130 IS is perfect for the family photographer who needs more lens length.

The last of our under $300 super zoom cameras is the Nikon L110. And talk about great for sports, the L110 can capture 11 images per second for up to 20 consecutive shots. The 15X zoom lens is backed up with 5-way image stabilization unique to Nikon. The L110 is the largest of this first trio of cameras, but it is still a compact handful. At $279.99 the Nikon L110 offers some serious features normally found on much more expensive cameras.

Other cameras that fit in the under $300 group are the Fuji JZ300 with its 10X zoom lens and very compact body, the Nikon S5100 with blazing speed and a 5X zoom, the Canon SX210IS that features an amazing 14X zoom lens in a shirt pocket sized body, and the Nikon S8100 with a 10X zoom. These alternate cameras provide many of the features found on our super zoom class but they aren’t quite as fast or as powerful.

Now for the over $300 super zoom crowd. The three cameras we have chosen to feature in this group are extreme in many respects. All feature 25X zooms or longer, two feature 720p HD video capability while the third has 1080p HD. All models have HDMI ports for direct HDTV connection.

The Olympus SP-800UZ offers a 30X wide angle zoom lens. One button starts movie recording ion 720p HD. Internal enhancements provide excellent face detection and tracking, creative filters and more. At $349.99 the Olympus SP-800UZ is one of the lowest priced cameras with a lens longer than 25X.

Nikon offers their P100 with 26X zoom lens. In the hand a Nikon P100 feels solid and substantial, the hand grip fits into your palm like it was tailored just for you. 10 frames per second shooting can keep up with the fastest action and Nikon’s 5-Way image stabilization keeps your images sharp. The P100 is one of the first compact cameras to offer 1080p HD video capture. We like the P100 because we believe with its construction points and feature set it will be a photographer favorite for years. At $399.99 you get a lot of camera in the box.

The last of our super zoom cameras is the Canon SX30 IS. Though not the first bridge camera, the Canon IS series has been the most enduring. Starting with the S1-IS in 2004 the series has been a consistent top choice. Coming from such a long line of Canon IS cameras, the SX30 tops them all with a 35X wide angle zoom lens and features not really even thought of back in 2004.

The Canon SX30 IS is the most expensive of our super zoom set, priced at $429.99. Like the Nikon discussed before, the SX130 IS is solid, compact and supremely well thought out. The controls are all handy and the operation is very straight forward. After all these generations of IS cameras, Canon isn’t making any mistakes in design. The lens is ultra long and it is also the widest angle of any super zoom. We like the SX30 IS because we think it is a camera that will last for years and still compare well to whatever the future brings our way.

There we have it, our round up of super zoom cameras. As we have seen we can get high magnification and fast operation priced from $229.99 all the way up to $429.99. Panasonic, Samsung and several other brands also offer super zooms, but the cameras mentioned in this article all lead the pack for features, image quality and reliability.

Digital Camera Prices

The range of digital cameras have expanded greatly since the first true digital camera, a Dycam Model 1, was released on the market in 1990. The Dycam Model 1 could connect to a computer, but it was not until the development of CompactFlash memory, first used in the Kodak DC-25, that the portability and versatility of digital cameras started to catch the eyes of the general consumer. As the technology became less expensive to produce, digital camera prices likewise went from professional, to pro-sumer, to consumer level. Today, digital cameras come in a wide range of prices and have even become a standard feature of cellphones.

When the Kodak DC-25 was released in 1996, it had a 493×373 pixel CCD image sensor, which is less than 0.3 megapixels, could store up to 26 images on a 2MB CompactFlash card, and had a price tag of around $500. Standard digital cameras today start at 5.0 megapixels, can use memory cards with capacities between 512MB and 16GB, and cost around $80. Today, $500 can pay for a camera with 13.5 megapixels and a suite of features that were not even available to professional grade cameras in 1996. Digital cameras have come a long way since the Dycam Model 1 which would be over matched today by a cellphone with a built in camera.

Digital camera prices and image sensor strength were not the only features to have been improved since the days of the Kodak DC-25. Digital cameras today come in all sorts of designs and sizes. Older cameras had to be carried around in thick bags to protect the lens. Standard digital cameras today have a telescoping lens that recedes back into the device condensing the camera to pocket size. There are also models that are slim as an old cassette case.. Even the larger, SLR models of digital cameras are easier to handle than the professional grade cameras of the past.

When digital cameras became available to the general consumer, professional photographic quality was accessible off the shelf as never before. Cameras more powerful than the best available in the past are now contained within devices that can fit in a pocket. As the technology shrunk, so did the digital camera prices. Great digital cameras are easy to find, and with prices well within the consumer range, that influence will continue spread and steer the next generation of digital cameras into greater leaps in quality and affordability.

Photographing Clouds

The use of filters can help the photographer emphasize these differences. A UV filter is great to cut through haze and improve clarity. A polarizing filter is perhaps even better to isolate the different areas of the clouds and highlight their features. When doing black and white photography, a red filter is a plus to use to make the clouds really stand out and appear bolder.

A good time to photograph cumulus clouds is both before and after a storm. In California where I live, high clouds will normally precede an approaching storm front followed by more and more cumulus clouds as the cloud cover drops lower and the clouds thicken. At anytime during this process great opportunities for photographs exist. Here in California and other desert areas during the summer monsoonal rain season, thunderheads will often begin to build up over the mountain areas. These gigantic cloud formations stretching thousands of feet into the air are particularly beautiful to photograph as the sunlight plays upon their different features.

Always use a study tripod so that there is no camera movement. The evening is a great time to photograph thunderheads as the light at this time will give them a beautiful reddish glow. Also, scattered clouds at just the right particular height will take on some beautiful warm red to fuchsia colors. I love to photograph clouds that are categorized as “linear ventricular”. These clouds are long horizontally and have the shape of a “flying saucer”. They too are often found during the monsoonal season hanging over mountainous regions.

Video Surveillance Camera

  • Fixed vs PTZ: A camera can be fixed to only look at one specific view or it can be movable through the use of panning, tilting and zooming (i.e., moving left and right, up and down, closer and farer away). Most cameras used in surveillance are fixed. PTZ cameras are generally used to cover wider fields of views and should generally be used only if you expect a monitor to actively use the cameras on a daily basis. A key reason fixed cameras are generally used is that they cost 5 -8 times less than PTZs (fixed cameras average $200 – $500 USD whereas PTZ cameras can be over $2,000 USD).
  • Color vs Infrared vs Thermal: In TV, a video can be color or black and white. In video surveillance today, the only time producing a black and white image makes sense is when lighting is very low (e.g., night time). In those conditions, infrared or thermal cameras produce black and white images. Infrared cameras require special lamps (infrared illuminators) that produce clear image in the dark (but are significantly more expensive than color cameras – often 2x to 3x more). Thermal cameras require no lighting but product only silhouettes of objects and are very expensive ($5,000 – $20,000 on average) In day time or lighted areas, color cameras are the obvious choice as the premium for color over black and white is trivial.
  • Standard Definition vs. Megapixel: This choice is similar to that of TVs. Just like in the consmer world, historically everyone used standard definition cameras but now users are shifting into high definition cameras. While high definition TV maxes out at 3 MP, surveilance cameras can provide up to 16 MP resolution. In 2008, megapixel cameras only represent about 4% of total cameras sold but they are expanding very rapidly. See a demonstration of megapixel cameras to learn more.
  • IP vs Analog: The largest trend in video surveillance today is the move from analog cameras to IP cameras. While all surveillance cameras are digitized to view and record on computers, only IP cameras digitize the video inside the camera. While most infrared and thermal cameras are still only available as analog cameras, you can only use megapixel resolution in IP cameras. Currently, 20% of cameras sold are IP and this percentage is increasingly rapidly.

Select The Scenic Places For Photography

Finding the perfect location to be shot: It’s always easy and comfortable to go for places around you, like a park. But to find a location for a memorable picture one can think of some special locations like the ocean side, mountains or forest-side. Each location has its own individuality and charm which makes the picture interesting and happening.

Perfect natural lighting: A location which has natural light is preferred by a photographer. But try to avoid direct sunlight of the mid day, always go for shaded lighting than a harsh one. A soft and flattering sunlight would bring out the best picture. Early mornings and evenings light would be the best lighting for a perfect picture.

Being alert: Photography in outdoor locations always comes with the risk of sudden and unexpected changes in weather. So be sure you are ready with a back up plan and have necessary arrangements, in case of bad weather conditions. Make sure you have got something like a shaded shelter nearby to protect your photographic equipments from sudden downpour.

Always go for quiet places: A crowded place is always a distraction to capture the real scenic beauty. Mountains, hills, beach side etc are some of the best locations for scenic photography. These scenic places provide ample opportunities for experimenting.

Decide on a focal point: A focal point always gives your landscape a certain definition and brings out an amazing and eye-catching frame to the viewers. A tree that appears unique or a formation in rock or anything else that appears striking can be taken as the focal point to enhance your photograph.

Cover the sky in photograph: Always make it a point to include and give due consideration to include sky above the landscape in your photograph. A scenic beauty would look incomplete without its overlying sky. Different colours of the sky and formations out of clouds can really bring out an awesome look to the landscape. Even if the look of the sky is dull it can be enhanced with the help of filters.