Tricks Photograph in the Snow

Most cameras see the snow as a brightly lit area and adjust the exposure towards middle gray to account for it. In other words, the picture comes out dark. The camera’s exposure meter can’t tell the difference between snow white or any other color. It simply tries to adjust the bright white towards an average scene. This leaves your breathtaking snow pictures dark and gray looking instead of vibrant white. Welcome to the world of snow photography!

Now, I guess you are wondering how you can stop the camera from doing that, so you can get the photo you desire. It’s quite simple. All you have to do is adjust the exposure compensation setting on your camera to the setting that gives you the look you desire. You may want to start with EV +1 as that works well most of the time. Check the manual that came with your camera to find out how to set this on your particular camera model. It could be an EV dial marked with numbers or it could be a button with a +/- symbol on many cameras.

Getting the right exposure may take more than one try, but once you are accustomed to using the settings on your specific camera you will be taking those magnificent snow shots in no time. Tip: Take a look at the histogram if you’re using a digital camera to guarantee perfect results. The beauty of having a digital camera is that you can try a few settings before getting the perfect shot. If you have a film camera, you may want to play with a test roll of film and record the settings before you do an actual “real” shoot. A plus for film camera users is that film is more forgiving with exposure than a digital camera, so you’ve got a lot of latitude. With that said, continue to play with camera settings. You just may find you enjoy taking some overly bright or darker photos to use for background images or to cut and play around with a digital photo program such as Adobe PhotoShop.

GoPro Editing Software

The first thing you want to have is a designated folder for your video files. If you like to record a lot of video, then you would be surprised to learn just how much space it takes up over time and how quickly it can get out of hand for you to try to keep track of your files. For individual video projects you will want to create sub-folders and organize them either by date or by specific project titles. This will also make it easier to pull any videos for further edits.

On the technical side of the GoPro video editing process you want to be sure to have a dedicated video editor. If you are stuck using Windows Movie Maker then you will definitely want to download the free GoPro Studio Edit Software. This program natively handles GoPro video files without the need for conversion so you can put your footage straight into the program. Under normal circumstances Windows Movie Maker would be adequate but GoPro footage is a step above simple home movies so using a more upscale editing program will help you get the best out of your footage.

As for the manner in which you edit it, some basic tips would be to edit out the first and last few moments of your video. There is nothing really compelling about those first few moments where you turn your camera on and those last few moments where you turned it off. You want to really be sure that your footage is enthralling, so any parts that do not seem exciting should go. If you are going to put music in your video and you have a piece of footage that has a singular stand out moment then you want to use music that has tension and then release. This is why you will often hear dubstep used in GoPro videos as many editors like to punctuate the stand out moment with the bass drop. Ultimately you should edit your video in a way that you find pleasing.

Take Great Water Photos

Freeze Water

There is no way you will take great photos if you don’t freeze the water. One of the most effective ways of doing this is using a very fast shutter speed. This calls for you to set your camera to its fastest shutter speed.

Be Cautious When Shooting Large Waves

Waves are great when you shoot them properly. You should note that the larger the wave, the more dramatic it is. To take excellent photos you should use a lens with a long focal length. You should also remember to keep your distance when taking the photos.

Use Reflection To Your Advantages

Water has a great reflective quality; therefore, you should take advantage of it. For ideal results you should shoot in more than one direction while paying a lot of attention to the position of the sun.

To add interest to your photos you should try shooting early in the morning or late in the day. The cool thing with shooting at this time is that you allow the long shadows cast by the boats and other water objects to add interest to your photos.

Zoom In The Details

To get a closer look you should zoom in the details of the photos that you are taking. To shoot great images you shouldn’t shoot the first object that catches your eye-you should take your time and identify any patterns that might be on the water. For example, if you are shooting on a water body with boats, you should identify a pattern in the ropes or any other items laid on the dock or boat’s deck.

Include People And Wildlife

Although, you can take great photos of plain water, you should make the photos interesting by including people and any animals that might be near the water. For example, if your children or your family members are walking on the shoreline, you should take photos of them.

If you are going to photograph strangers, always seek their permission. For ideal results you should ask the people to avoid looking at the camera-they should act naturally.

Compose A Great Photo

Rule Of Thirds

Compose your photo using the rule of thirds. Divide the picture area in to nine squares. Supposing you are taking a photograph of a landscape then the top one-third should be of the horizon and the bottom two-thirds should be of the scenery closer to you. You can also use this to compose the picture of a person by placing them in the central two squares and the back ground in the rest of the area of the picture. If it is a river or mountain in the background then place the person in the right or left bottom two squares of the composition while the river or mountain is placed on the side in the background.

Golden Triangle

When there are strong diagonal elements in the subject, divide the scenery into three triangles. A right-angled triangle occupies one half of the photo with the leading edge of the triangle running from one corner of the picture area to the other. The other half of the picture frame is divided into two right triangles by drawing a line from one corner to the diagonal. This draws attention to the strong elements in the bottom half where the two triangles are present. The other half is devoted to the background like a dark sky or a misty mountain.

Leading and Converging Lines

Here you take some lines like a road, a pathway edged on both sides by trees, a bridge leading towards the other end and composing a photo by drawing in the viewer’s eyes into the different elements that you want to highlight. Diverging lines distract the viewer away from the photo. So, take care when composing these photos.

The Fibonacci Spiral or Golden Spiral

Arranging the photographic elements in a Fibonacci spiral dramatically leads the viewers into the vortex of the picture. Take a spiral staircase or a whorl of a snail or a leaf delicately curled up and you get an idea of how this picture can be composed.

Info of Handling New Models

For one, this diverts the hair and makeup craftsman. Rather, I watch them painstakingly. I search for their general feeling of being. How they hold themselves, on the off chance that they are loquacious with the hairdresser or in the event that they’re timid and hard to get through. I search for their body stance, they’re general nearness. It’s somewhat similar to being an investigator. Then again even an analyst.

When I get them before my camera to start with, I warm them up by being well disposed yet not excessively fake. I need them to realize that my gestures of recognition are real and not over the top. I need to recollect that new young ladies to require a great deal of commendation. Generally now, when I shoot, the models are experienced. It’s less demanding for me since I don’t need to do a great deal of persuading or notwithstanding guiding. They take after my couple of bearings and it’s forward to a breathtaking shoot. Yet, new young ladies don’t know how to act out, generally. What’s more, they don’t know how to posture. They are new to their bodies, making it extreme for them to radiate certainty. I generally warm up by shooting a couple “test” pictures so I can learn about them and see where their qualities and shortcomings are.

I am not a bombastic picture taker. I don’t holler out things like, “goodness infant, that is hot!” or “gracious stunning, offer it to me infant”. A few young ladies require that, I assume. To me it just feels gooey. I feel it’s needless excess to let them know each time the shade clicks how astonishing they are. Be that as it may, for some new young ladies, it’s practically required. So I need to yield and yell out a couple of those regular lines. I overlook I need to, and I’m immediately reminded to do as such when they’re not warmed up after the initial 100 pictures.

I need to concede that more often than not I need to get on the cyc and demonstrate to them a couple postures. At that point I begin doing it before them when I have my camera up to my eye, making it a humorous however viable showcase. They take after my lead in the end and we can get on with making an extraordinary style shoot.

Music makes a difference. Giggling makes a difference. Making things light and straightforward, not excessively strained makes a difference. All things considered, we need to recall that it’s a fashion shoot, not Supreme Court. Young ladies look better and move better when they’re casual and calm. I’m not a despot on my sets so I think this for the most part helps the anxious young ladies unwind after a couple of shots.

Monet has gone ahead in her profession to wind up a refined on-screen character with parts in Johnny Depp’s “Blow” and “Stoned”, where she played renowned worldwide fashion symbol and rock spouse, Anita Pallenberg.

I had given Monet a couple times before we did this shoot together and I saw that Monet worked best when she was given a part to work with. Having her walk and move around worked superior to anything remaining on a consistent and posturing. So I took her out to the slopes in Malibu and we simply played. The outcomes were magnificent to the point that I did my extremely display show with the 16 pictures we got from our one day shoot.

Set Up a Simple Photography Studio

Let’s start with the most available light there is, daylight. It might seem silly, but using the natural daylight, will provide you with the best light there is. Studio lights, are built to try and mimic this light in it’s various forms. Sitting your subject next to a window, will provide a very complimentary colour and softness to the light. The softer the light, the more it wraps around your subject.

If using the window method, try both direct sunlight and indirect shaded light for different effects, and the best part, it’s free! To mimic this kind of light we use studio strobes or “flash” as they are commonly known. The easiest set up to get, is a single strobe and a large reflector and stand. Many places sell these as kits for as little as $600, sometimes including remote wireless triggers, so you don’t even have to be anywhere near the lights when shooting. Compare that to an on-camera flash kit, which can cost $400 up for a good system, the extra few dollars are going to give you so much more creative freedom to experiment. Look for kits that include the light, stand, remote trigger and a softbox. You must get a softbox. No softbox, no soft complimenting light. If not included, they start relatively cheap anyway, at around $100, often less.

A system offering around 400 watts of power is plenty for a small studio, but make sure you can adjust the power up or down by at least 1/4 of a stop with each change. Good systems such as those from Elinchrom and ProFoto provide great control in 10th’s of a stop. Small, but often needed for subtle improvements. Light with a basic reflector that offers gold, silver, white, black and translucent, will serve the best. These are known as 5 way reflectors. The gold offers a subtle, warm (orange) tone, whilst the silver cools the light down with a slight blue cast. White adds light to increase the exposure, and black subtracts light, adding a high contrast look. The final element is the translucent disc, acting like a small softbox or cloud. To explain, clouds make for the perfect softener of light, acting as a gigantic “diffuser”. The larger the light source, the softer the light becomes, as the further it has to travel across a surface, before spilling into the subject below. As an example, shining a torch through a bed sheet will spread the light evenly, whilst the torch itself, will pinpoint the light. A good start for absolute beginners is to get a continuous light kit, instead of a flash kit. With the continuous kit, simply switch it on, look through the viewfinder, and what you see is what you get. Problem with continuous lighting is, it’s often hot, tungsten lights are noisy, cast a yellow light, and become very hot to touch within a very short time of turning them on. New manufacturers are making this easier, with cold LED lights that mimic daylight, but have a big cheque ready if you want a set. A simple strobe kit is not hard to master.

Droste Effect Photography

Use photo editing software

Once you have taken a photo that you are happy with, open up your photo editing software program of choice, and open an image on your computer that you want to apply the Droste effect to. Your photo editing software program will open the file for editing. Using an eraser or brush tool from the control panel, click on the slider to make the edges of the eraser feathered. You may want to play around with a number of different brush presets in the control panel area before you choose on a tool which will best create this effect. An eraser or brush tool with a feathered edge can soften the transitions between the different images that you will use to create the Droste effect.

Use the brush tool to erase portions of the image

Using the brush or eraser tool on the photo that you want to edit, erase regions of the image which have an outline. If you have opened a photograph portrait of a face, use the eraser to erase areas of the face that have strong outlines, such as the hairline and the eyebrow. Use a layer in the control panel that will enable you to duplicate the image, and then drag the second layer so it is placed underneath the original image. You will be able to see the original image underneath the areas you have erased using the brush or eraser tool.

Rotate the layer

Use a tool that enables you to rotate the second layer to a different position than the original layer. You should be able to do this by dragging the corners of the box of the duplicated layer and rotating the image to a different orientation. Drag the box corner slowly until you are happy with the finished result. The duplicated layer should appear much further back in the image, creating an almost 3D-like quality. Repeat this process until you have numerous layers which have been rotated. You may need to employ trial and error until you end up with a finished image that recreates Droste effect photography.

Ways to Earn As You Shoot

Sell your photos at local art shows

One of the best ways you can make money from your photos is to sell your prints at local street fairs and art shows. You can turn your best photos into small postcards, framed prints, or canvas art pieces and set up a stall to display your work. Look online for art shows and fairs in your local area, and set aside a budget to have your photos printed in a number of different formats in professional quality. You never know who might see your work, and selling your prints could lead to a number of different work opportunities.

Take on some paid jobs

Although it might not be the type of photography you want to specialize in, you can make money from taking photos at weddings, anniversaries, birthdays and engagement parties. Create a blog or website that lists your fees for these services and post examples of your work online. When taking a job, always discuss with the client about the particulars of the project. You can even take photos that you are particularly proud of and add these to your portfolio. Leave business cards with local businesses, such as hair salons and florists, or take out an advertisement in the classifieds section of your local newspaper. You might even want to offer to take free photos at a charity event in order to network and meet potential new clients. Talk to friends and family members about whether they know anyone who requires a good photographer for a social function or event, and start planning how you can make money from offering this service.