Nikon Camera Bag

Film Cameras. They are for avid photographers mostly. There is an intrinsic charm to film photography, but it’s definitely less practical and more expansive than digital photography. That being said it’s hard nowadays to come by an old school case, although not impossible. My suggestion is to look online for a leather case from Nikon. For the sake of the good looks and class you might get a second hand one.

Compact cameras. For the small point and shoot cameras there is a great selection of digital camera pouches to choose from. By far my favorite brand would be Crumpler, because they don’t put out any dull designs. Try to consider that next time you want to buy a camera pouch.

Depending on what you are looking for the camera bag to do for your camera you might consider ‘camera sleeves’ as well. They are small and offer almost no protection against bumps, but on the other hand if you only need to protect your camera from scratches and plan on carrying it in a purse or a bigger bag, than camera sleeves might be just what you need. Also a nice feature to look for when buying a camera sleeve is the wrist band, that allows you to carry the camera attached to your arm, making you an instant tourist. Lovely. As side benefits to that tourist look they give you, the camera sleeves are more comfortable and less bulky than any other camera carrier.

For more practical features and even more protection go for digital camera bags or camera pouches as they are called in a weird circle of friends. These babies tend to give you more protection and more room for accessories. On the flip side of course they are bulkier than the camera sleeves, and cost just a little bit more. The things you should look for when buying are still a wrist band (and/or belt strap, though this is definitely not my style) that makes it easier to carry around, water proofing and last but not least design. The big four in camera bag manufacturing, meaning: Tamrac, Lowepro, Crumpler and Kata will of course offer you pretty much everything I’ve mentioned above, and they are really high quality materials, thus providing your camera pouch with a longer lifespan than even the camera inside.

Some Nikon Coolpix models have a lens that sticks out of the camera, and for those I highly recommend you go with the camera pouches.

Next on the list are digital SLR camera bags, or simply put just “slr camera bags”. This is where you really start paying attention to what you are getting. Basically if you have one camera body that you carry around and a lens or two, go with this option. As I mention before the big 4 is what I recommend you go for, most of their slr camera bags are waterproof have a shoulder strap, and a handle so they are easy to carry around and have enough room for accessories. The main issue here is to get a camera bag that fits what you want to carry and you might want to think ahead for future investments in lenses, because it would be a bummer 6 months down the road to get another lens and then have to compromise between lenses when going on a trip or on a project. Also you might want to consider the amount of accessories you will take along. The basic bag has enough room for you to fit an extra battery, an extra card, some filters and that’s about it. But fear not my good friend for others have faced this problem before and the solution are bigger camera bags obviously. The shoulder slr camera bags (i.e. Crumpler Million Dollar Home series). My personal favorite would have the Lowepro camera bags here, unless you need a shoulder bag where I vote for Crumpler again.

The last but certainly not the least class of camera holders are the digital camera backpacks. If you are like me you can hear a thousand angels singing in the background as you read this. The camera backpacks are the ultimate in photography mobility so to speak. Some backpacks can fit so much equipment that by the time you zip up the last zipper you realize you could trade that backpack with everything in it for a European luxury car. Again, Crumpler felt the need to stand out and it did it quite well. Crumpler backpacks are a bit smaller than the most popular models from Tamrac and Lowepro, but that gives you a really important advantage which can be vital (at least for your photo equipment) when the need arises. And I’m talking here about Crumpler meeting the flight regulations for carry-on luggage, meaning you won’t have to trust anybody to handle your precious camera other than yourself. Why this can be vital?! Well because most baggage handlers make accidents happen and you don’t want your camera to be involved in that. Don’t believe me? Look up ‘united breaks guitars’ on YouTube and than consider if you would like to carry your backpack with you or let the handlers throw it around.

Getting back to Nikon, the slr camera bags and the camera backpacks are targeted at D700 family of nikons and above (D80, D300, D3 all the other good stuff). If you have let’s say a D300 with the 70-200mm and a couple other lenses plus accessories, forget about slr camera bags and just go straight to shoulder slr bag or the backpacks. My friendly suggestion would be to opt for a camera backpack because it’s going to be less strain on your back.